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  • A haematoma is a large blood blister which results from rupture of a small blood vessel with resulting haemorrhage between the skin and cartilage usually on the inner aspect of the ear.

  • This slow-growing tumour is a disordered overgrowth of cells of the skin epidermis. It gets its name from its resemblance under the microscope to the basal cell layer of epithelium.

  • It is not unusual for behaviour problems to develop in older pets. Many of the problems have similar causes to those in younger pets.

  • The names for the non-cancerous fibrous growths include collagenous hamartoma, fibroepithelial polyp, skin tag, cutaneous tag, hyperplastic or hypertrophic scar and acrochordon. A hamartoma is defined as a nodular, poorly circumscribed focus of redundant tissue.

  • This is any tumour originating from the mammary gland tissues. Most tumours of this type are cured by total surgical removal but a few progress to malignancy in time and start to spread to other parts of the body (metastasis).

  • Calculi, popularly called stones can develop in many cavities in the body, e.g. the gall bladder, kidney, etc. They are commonest in the urinary tract where they are termed uroliths.

  • Non-cancerous bone tumours are rare in cats and mainly due to abnormal development. They include bone cysts and single or multiple lumps of bone in abnormal places (exostoses).

  • Non-cancerous bone tumours are rare and mainly due to abnormal development. They include bone cysts and single or multiple lumps of bone in abnormal places (exostoses).

  • Caesarian section is a major operation carried out to remove puppies that cannot be born normally. Both the anaesthetic procedure and the surgical technique are designed to ensure that recovery is as rapid as possible.

  • Calcium deposits in the skin have a variety of causes, usually of minor significance in the young but indicating serious disease in some older animals.

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